Types of Low Vision

There are numerous types of vision acuity changes, each with its own signs and symptoms. Some are simply differences in severity, while others cause losses in different areas. If you are wondering about the types of low vision, here’s a look at the most common kinds.  

Central Vision Loss  

With central vision loss, a person usually has a blurry section or blind spot in the middle of their visual field. However, the vision issue doesn’t extend to their peripheral (side) vision.  

Often, a person with central vision loss has difficulties reading. They may struggle with recognizing faces, as well as identifying details at a distance.  

In most cases, central vision loss has a limited impact (if any) on mobility. The remaining peripheral vision gives the person enough to generally move about safely.  

Peripheral Vision Loss  

Essentially a counter to central vision loss, with peripheral vision loss, the blurriness or blind spots can be on one or both sides, above, below, or all around the central portion of the visual area. Usually, the person can see directly ahead, creating a form of tunnel vision.  

Reading, identifying people’s faces, and even seeing at a distance may be manageable with peripheral vision loss. However, mobility may be impacted if the peripheral vision loss is severe. Additionally, in serious cases, reading speed may be slowed, as only a couple of words may be visible at a given time.  

Blurred Vision  

With blurred vision, a person’s entire visual field is affected. Everything may appear to be out of focus, regardless of whether an object is close or far away. The issue also remains even with corrective lenses.  

However, the field of view isn’t necessarily cloudy. Colors can remain clean and crisp, even as the objects seem to be out of focus. For example, a healthy grass lawn may appear vibrantly green, but the blades of grass can’t be separately identified.  

Generalized Hazy Vision  

At times referred to as cloudy vision, generalized hazy vision also impacts the entire visual field. It’s not unlike trying to see through glare or a film, or as if a fog has come to rest permanently in front of the person’s eyes.  

Light Sensitivity  

In extreme cases, light sensitivity significantly alters a person’s vision. It occurs when normal lighting conditions seemingly overwhelm the person’s eyes, causing images to appear washed out. At times, light sensitivity can be accompanied by physical discomfort or pain even when the area’s lighting is considered a normal level.  

Night Blindness  

With night blindness, a person can’t see in dimly lit spaces, such as movie theatres or outside at night. Starlight and moonlight are usually insufficient. Even vehicle headlights may not provide enough illumination for them to drive safely.  

Ultimately, if you are struggling with low vision, scheduling an appointment with your eye doctor is essential. The ECVA team will work diligently to determine the cause of your low vision, ensuring proper steps can be taken to ensure your eyes’ health and preserve or restore your vision when possible. Schedule an appointment at your closest ECVA clinic today. 

Your Safety is Our Priority

Starting on Monday, May 18, 2020, all ECVA locations will be re-opening. Our goal is to provide high-quality eye care services to each and every one of our patients during these unprecedented times.

Your safety is our priority. As a result, we will be taking extra precautions to ensure your health as well as the health of our staff. We are adhering to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommendations to preserve the well-being of everyone who comes into our clinics. Here is an overview of any changes you may experience when coming in for an eye care appointment.

Socially Distanced Waiting Areas

Each of the waiting rooms in our clinics has been reconfigured. The adjustments support social distancing standards, ensuring patients can remain appropriately separated during their visits.

Protective Shielding

Reducing the spread of germs is essential. Each ECVA clinic now has protective shielding installed in the reception areas, a step that can mitigate the spread of diseases.

Surgical Mask Requirements

When coming in for an office visit, all patients will have to wear surgical masks. This step can help reduce the spread of germs, keeping both patients and staff members safer.

PPE Use by Staff

When appropriate, staff members may choose to wear additional personal protective equipment (PPE). Along with surgical masks, this can include medical gloves, protective face shields, and protective eyewear.

Handwashing Practices

Handwashing can be an effective approach for combating the spread of germs. Our clinics now have new standards in place that promote more frequent handwashing, a step that enhances safety for patients and staff members alike.

Disinfecting

While disinfecting surfaces has always been a priority at ECVA, those efforts are currently enhanced. Along with all equipment used on patients, seating areas and work surfaces are be disinfected regularly throughout the day.

Visitor Limits

As a means of keeping patients and staff members protected, we are requesting that friends or family members who arrive at an appointment with a patient remain in their vehicles. If that is not possible, we ask that only those with an appointment head into the exam room to meet with their doctor.

Rescheduling

If you or a household member are experiencing symptoms that may be associated with COVID-19, or you have been recently exposed to anyone with symptoms, we ask that you reschedule your office appointment. The potential symptoms include:

  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Shortness of breath
  • Fever

We would also like to reiterate that the situation is fluid, and new precautions may be implemented should the need arise. If you have questions regarding the new processes or about your upcoming appointment, or have an emergency eye care need, please contact the ECVA main office at (716) 631-8888. Our team will be happy to speak with you.

We also thank our patients for their patience during these unique times. We look forward to seeing you again starting on May 18.

Corona Virus Patient Message

The health and safety of our patients and staff is a top priority for Eye Care and Vision Associates (ECVA). We are closely monitoring updates from trusted health care organizations and governmental recommendations regarding the novel Corona Virus (COVID-19).

Please be advised that as a health care provider, we will continue to provide services for our patients as necessary. We will also be adhering to infection control guidelines as provided by the Center for Disease Control (CDC).

So that we can mitigate the spread of infectious disease, ECVA respectfully requests that you please contact our office @ (716) 631-3937 (Eyes) to reschedule your office appointment if:

  1. You are feeling ill or experiencing flu-like symptoms
  2. Have experienced a fever in the last 24 hours
  3. Have a cough, sore throat or shortness of breath
  4. Been exposed to anyone with the above symptoms or has been diagnosed with the Corona Virus
  5. Traveled to a region with a known transmission of the Corona Virus per the CDC website within the past 14 days.

Thank you in advance for your cooperation and for the trust that you have placed in ECVA.

Amblyopia (Lazy Eye) in Adults

Amblyopia – also known as lazy eye – is an eye condition that isn’t caused by an underlying disease. Usually, it only impacts one eye. However, there are some patients that have amblyopia in both eyes. 

Adults with the condition often experience reduced vision that isn’t always correctable with glasses or contact lenses. Typically, the vision loss is due to how the brain treats input from the amblyopic eye or eyes. Instead of fully acknowledging the visual stimuli, the brain seemingly ignores the visuals. While the eye may also point inward or outward, the physical misalignment isn’t the source of the vision reduction. 

Signs of Amblyopia 

Certain symptoms are common with amblyopia. One or both eyes may wander inward or outward, or both eyes may not seem to be working together. Depth perception tends to be poor, and a person with amblyopia may squint or shut one eye to achieve greater visual acuity. Head tilting when examining an object is also a possible sign, along with frequent eye strain, eye fatigue, or headaches. 

In many cases, amblyopia is detectable during a vision screening as well. Since eye exams look at visual acuity in a variety of scenarios, the visual acuity reduction can typically be identified. 

Typical Causes of Amblyopia 

One of the most common causes of amblyopia is strabismus, a condition where one eye is turned, preventing proper alignment between both eyes. Another potential source of lazy eye is anisometropia, where each eye has different levels of visual acuity. Trauma and eye blockage (such as a drooping eyelid) may also cause amblyopia. 

The reason these conditions can lead to amblyopia is the difference in visual capability. If one eye is capable of seeing clearly, but the other isn’t, the brain suppresses the information that is coming from the latter eye. That processing change can result in permanent vision loss. 

Treatment for Amblyopia 

Many people believe that amblyopia is only treatable in children, often those who are 12 years of age or younger. However, this isn’t necessarily the case. While every patient is different, some adults can see results from amblyopia treatment. 

Typically, eye patching or drops alone isn’t sufficient. While this may increase the visual acuity of the amblyopic eye, the approach isn’t guaranteed to result in better binocular vision (when both eyes work together). Without training to learn how to combine visuals from both eyes simultaneously, the overall results tend to be lackluster and don’t often stand the test of time. 

Luckily, there are other treatment options. Optometric vision therapy can help patients by engaging their eyes during activities that require binocular vision and encompass all distances (far, middle, and near). 

Essentially, the amblyopic eye undergoes physical therapy in conjunction with the healthy eye. And, in many cases, the visual acuity improvements can be substantial. 

There isn’t technically a surgery to correct amblyopia. However, if another condition is involved, such as strabismus, then surgical correction of that condition may be necessary. That way, it will be easier to train both eyes to work together. 

If you have amblyopia and are looking for treatment options, schedule an appointment at your nearest ECVA clinic today. Our talented team works diligently to ensure your eye health, performing thorough exams to identify any issues that may need correcting. We can design treatment options to meet your unique needs, providing the best outcome possible. 

Learn the Difference Between Seeing an Optometrist and an Ophthalmologist

When you choose an eye care provider, you are trusting the health of your eyes and quality of your vision to that professional. Many patients mistakenly assume that optometrists and ophthalmologists are the same, particularly since both are doctors that focus on the eye.

However, optometrists and ophthalmologists are actually very different. Before you entrust your vision and eye health to a doctor, here’s what you need to know about the difference between seeing an optometrist and an ophthalmologist.

What is an Optometrist?

Optometrists are eye health specialists who have earned a Doctor of Optometry (OD) degree. They have specialized education and training that allow them to perform exams that can spot vision issues and a variety of eye health problems. However, an OD is not a medical doctor (MD), so they are governed by different rules regarding medical care.

An optometrist can prescribe corrective lenses, such as glasses or contact lenses. Additionally, they are licensed to prescribe medications that can treat certain eye-related conditions or diseases.

However, precisely how much medical care an optometrist can provide is determined by state law, though it is almost never as comprehensive as you can receive from an MD. For example, optometrists are usually not licensed or trained to perform eye surgeries, though there are a few exceptions.

What is an Ophthalmologist?

Unlike an optometrist, an ophthalmologist is typically an MD. These professionals went to medical school, completed medical internships, residencies, and, possibly, fellowships, focusing their studies on the eye and surrounding areas.

Ophthalmologists are not only trained to perform vision exams, identify eye health issues, prescribe corrective lenses, and treat various eye conditions, they are also able to perform eye surgeries. Essentially, an ophthalmologist can offer complete eye care services beyond what an optometrist is allowed to provide. This can include providing surgical care for diagnoses like cataracts, glaucoma, strabismus and more. Additionally, they can prescribe medications for the treatment of more complicated conditions, such as diabetes, that is impacting vision quality or eye health.

Choosing Between an Optometrist and Ophthalmologist

While both an optometrist and an ophthalmologist can assist with vision correction and address a range of eye health concerns, ophthalmologists have additional knowledge and capabilities that allow them to offer complete eye care. By choosing an ophthalmologist, you can receive comprehensive care from a single doctor, limiting the need for referrals for treating certain eye health concerns or conditions.

Alternatively, by choosing a clinic that has optometrists and ophthalmologists on staff, you can get a similar result. You have access to all of the specialists you may need under a single roof, allowing you to see the ideal professional based on your needs at any given point in time.

If you are concerned about your vision or eye health or haven’t seen an eye care professional recently, schedule an appointment at your nearest ECVA clinic today. Our experienced ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians work diligently to keep our patients’ eyes in the best condition possible and to correct vision issues quickly and efficiently, ensuring their vision remains clear and their eyes stay healthy.

TALK WITH ONE OF OUR EYE CARE PROFESSIONALS TODAY!

If you have further questions or would like to schedule an appointment with one of the Ophthalmologists at Eye Care and Vision Associates please call 716.631-EYES (3937) or visit www.ecvaeyecare.com .

Vision & Aging: What You Need to Know

As we age, our vision usually changes. Both eye disease and vision loss become more common as people get older, particularly once a person reaches their 60s and beyond.

Certain changes are normal and aren’t a signal of any kind of underlying disease. Others could be signs of more serious health problems. However, in both cases, if you don’t get your eyes checked regularly, your quality of life could diminish quickly.

Common Vision Changes as We Age

One of the most common forms of vision changes people experience is presbyopia. The lens of the eye starts to struggle to change shape, making it harder to focus on objects that are close to you. Often, people first notice these shifts in their vision when they are reading, as they have to hold the text further away to be able to focus.

In many cases, presbyopia is easy to correct with reading glasses, regular prescription glasses or contact lenses. Some other options, like corrective surgeries, can also restore visual acuity.

Cataracts are also increasingly common as a person ages. The formation of cataracts makes it hard to see clearly, but they can typically be removed with a simple and highly effective surgery.

Major Age-Related Eye Diseases

Certain vision changes are signs of a more serious condition. Macular degeneration is a leading cause of blindness among older members of the population. As the macula deteriorates, central vision starts to fade. Over time, reading, driving, recognizing faces, using a computer and a variety of other tasks become more challenging. However, when caught early, treatment can limit the damage caused by macular degeneration and may even restore some visual acuity.

For every decade after you reach 40, your risk of developing glaucoma increases. As the optic nerve is damaged, vision loss occurs. Over time, blindness is a possibility. Without regular eye exams, spotting glaucoma before permanent damage is done is nearly impossible. However, when detected early, treatments can prevent or slow vision loss.

If you have diabetes, you are at risk of developing diabetic retinopathy, a condition that can lead to blindness. High blood glucose levels damage the blood vessels in the retina, preventing proper blood flow. In some cases, new blood vessels develop in the wrong parts of the eye, causing vision loss. Once you have diabetic retinopathy, you need to work with a medical provider to ensure you get the proper treatments.

The best way to identify and manage age-related vision changes and eye conditions is to see your ophthalmologist or optometrist regularly. During an exam, they can look for signs of changes and discuss any vision-related concerns you may have, as well as develop treatment plans to preserve your vision. If you haven’t seen an eye doctor recently, schedule an appointment at your nearest ECVA clinic today. Our experienced ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians work diligently to maintain the health of the eyes of our patients and to correct vision issues in patients of all ages, ensuring their eyes remain healthy and they can see clearly.

Talk With One Of Our Eye Care Professionals Today!

If you have further questions or would like to schedule an appointment with one of the Ophthalmologists at Eye Care and Vision Associates please call 716.631-EYES (3937) or visit www.ecvaeyecare.com .

Shield Your Eyes: Why UV Sunglasses Are Important

Most people understand that exposure to ultraviolet light in the sun’s rays can lead to sunburns or cause skin cancer. However, not as many people realize that UV light can harm their eyes as well, potentially leading to some serious health problems.

By wearing sunglasses that offer UV protection, you can prevent at least some of these harmful rays from reaching your eyes. If you want to know more about why UV sunglasses are important, here’s what you need to know.

Eye Problems and UV Light

Exposure to UV rays from the sun has been linked to several eye-related issues. Cataracts, photokeratitis, macular degeneration, pterygia, and pinguecula have all been connected to UV exposure, either as a potential cause or as something that can accelerate the condition.

Additionally, uveal melanoma is the most common form of eye cancer and is strongly connected to exposure to UV rays. It isn’t unlike most melanomas that show up on the skin; it is just limited to the eye area.

Understanding UV Light

UV rays are part of the light spectrum, though these rays aren’t detectable by the naked eye. Also known as ultraviolet radiation, UV rays fall into three categories: UVA, UVB, and UVC.

UVC is potentially the most harmful form, but the atmosphere’s ozone layer blocks nearly all UVC rays. UVB does make it through the atmosphere to a degree, and the cornea can absorb 100 percent of these rays, potentially leading to photokeratitis, pinguecula, and pterygium.

UVA has the ability to pass through the cornea and reach the retina and lens. Overexposure has been linked to some forms of cataracts, and it may lead to the development of macular degeneration.

Why UV Sunglasses are Important

UV sunglasses are often the best form of protection against potentially harmful UV rays. The lenses can prevent the UV rays from making their way to your eyes, reducing your level of exposure dramatically when the sunglasses are worn.

If you want the best possible protection, look for sunglasses that block 100% of every type of UV ray. Additionally, opt for wraparound sunglasses, as they cover the eyes more completely.

Sunglass lenses don’t necessarily have to be dark to be effective against UV rays. Even lighter or less opaque lenses can perform well if they are treated with the right coatings.

Prescription and non-prescription sunglasses can be made with UV-blocking lenses. If you would like to learn more about UV sunglasses or want to have an eye exam to make sure your eyes are healthy, schedule an appointment at your nearest ECVA clinic today. Our experienced ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians work diligently to maintain the health of the eyes of our patients, including identifying eye problems that may be the result of overexposure to harmful UV light. Additionally, our optical shop can help you select lenses that will protect you from potentially damaging UV rays, ensuring your eyes are always protected.

Book An Appointment Today!

If you have further questions or would like to schedule an appointment with one of the Ophthalmologists at Eye Care and Vision Associates please call 716.631-EYES (3937) or visit www.ecvaeyecare.com .

What is Diabetic Retinopathy?

Maintaining the health of your eyes is essential. Otherwise, a medical condition could cause irreparable damage, causing you to lose visual acuity or your ability to see.

If you suffer from diabetes, you could be at risk for diabetic retinopathy, a harmful condition that can rob you of your vision. Here’s what you need to know about this damaging eye disease.

What is Diabetic Retinopathy?

Diabetic retinopathy, in the simplest terms, is an eye disease that can occur in people who have diabetes and rob them of their vision. High blood sugar levels (blood glucose levels) can damage the blood vessels in the retina. Damaged blood vessels can lead to swelling and even leaking. In some cases, the blood vessels close, preventing blood from flowing properly in the eye. In both of those cases, your vision can be compromised, leading to diminished clarity or partial or full blindness.

At times, diabetic retinopathy can lead to the growth of new blood vessels on the retina. When this occurs, damage to your vision is possible, including falling acuity and even varying degrees of blindness.

Those in the initial stages of diabetic retinopathy may not know they have the condition. Often, the earliest symptoms can only be spotted during a thorough eye exam. However, noticeable symptoms do eventually occur, including blurriness, an increased number of floaters, vision changes, dark or black spots in the field of vision, declining night vision, and colors looking washed out or faded.

How is Diabetic Retinopathy Diagnosed?

First, your ophthalmologist will take a detailed medical history. As they proceed, they will ask you about any current medical conditions and whether you are experiencing any symptoms that could make you prone to diabetic retinopathy or indicate you may have the condition.

During an exam, the ophthalmologist uses drops to dilate your eyes, causing your pupils to widen. Then, they can examine your eye with a special lens, allowing them to look for signs of diabetic retinopathy.

In some cases, your ophthalmologist may perform a fluorescein angiography. A special dye is injected into a vein, typically in your arm. Then, once the dye reaches the blood vessels in your eye, images are captured with a special camera, letting your ophthalmologist to see any blockages, leaks, or abnormal blood vessel growth.

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an alternative approach for closely examining the retina. A specialized machine scans the eye, providing highly detailed images that can help your ophthalmologist spot signs of diabetic retinopathy.

How is Diabetic Retinopathy Treated?

If your ophthalmologist diagnoses you with diabetic retinopathy, they may recommend certain treatments based on how the condition presents in your eyes. Typically, they will discuss blood sugar control options that can help slow the condition or even restore some of your vision.

They may also recommend an anti-VEGF medication, a prescription designed the limit swelling in the macula of the eye and potentially stop or reverse vision loss, or steroids, which also reduce inflammation. These medications are administered by a medical professional as it has to be given as an injection in the eye.

Laser surgery is another potential treatment. The lasers can seal leaking blood vessels and reduce swelling. They can also shrink intrusive blood vessels and potentially prevent them from recurring.

In more advanced cases, vitrectomy – a surgical procedure that removes blood from leaking vessels and vitreous gel toward the back of the eye – allows light to properly pass through the retina. This can help improve your vision and slow the progression of the condition.

If you are concerned about the health of your eyes or have not had a recent checkup, schedule an appointment at your nearest ECVA location today. Our skilled ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians work diligently to maintain the health of your eyes and to correct vision issues, ensuring your eyes remain in the best shape possible and you can see clearly.

BOOK AN APPOINTMENT TODAY!

If you have further questions or would like to schedule an appointment with one of the Ophthalmologists at Eye Care and Vision Associates please call 716.631-EYES (3937) or visit www.ecvaeyecare.com .

The Telltale Signs Your Child Needs Glasses

Vision issues in children can be detrimental. Not being able to see clearly can cause a child to struggle in school or have problems reading and identifying objects. In some cases, it can even impact their safety, as not being able to see properly could cause them to miss potential hazards.

Detecting vision issues in children can be tricky for parents. Often, a child isn’t fully aware of changes in their ability to see, so they may not be able to tell you they are having problems seeing.

However, there are signs your child may need glasses. If you want to monitor the quality of your child’s eyesight, here are some signals they might need corrective lenses.

Squinting

If your child is having trouble focusing their eyes, they may start to squint. Squinting can limit the effects of a refractive error temporarily, so they may start doing it if their vision isn’t clear.

Head Tilting

Head tilting is an attempt to overcome a vision issue by changing the angle. If your child tilts their head when examining an object, they may have declining visual acuity.

Covering One Eye

Children that start covering one eye when they have clarity issues could be suffering from a range of vision conditions. Along with a decline in clarity, there could be an alignment issue, such as amblyopia (lazy eye).

Being Too Close to Screens and Books

When a child starts sitting closer to the television, brings digital devices nearer to their face, or practically buries their nose in a book, that is often a sign of declining visual acuity. If your child is nearsighted, being closer to the object increases clarity, making it easier to see.

Excessive Eye Rubbing

If your child starts rubbing their eyes frequently, they could be suffering from eye strain, a common symptom of vision changes. However, since it could also indicate other conditions, like conjunctivitis or allergies, it is best to see a medical professional to determine whether they need glasses or another form of treatment.

Headaches and Eye Pain

Children who struggle with eye pain or headaches near the end of the day could be overexerting their eyes in an attempt to compensate for poor vision. Since their eyes get to rest when they are sleeping, they may wake up feeling fine, only to experience the pain after they have spent some time trying to focus during the day.

Issues at School

If your child’s performance suddenly drops, they may be having vision trouble, causing them to struggle to read the board, books, assignments, or computer screens.

All the signs above could indicate that your child is struggling with declining vision and may need glasses. If you are concerned about your child’s eyesight, schedule an appointment at your nearest ECVA clinic today. Our experienced ophthalmologists, optometrists, and opticians work diligently to maintain the health of the eyes of our patients and to correct vision issues in patients of all ages, ensuring their eyes remain healthy and they can see clearly.

BOOK AN APPOINTMENT TODAY!

If you have further questions or would like to schedule an appointment with one of the Ophthalmologists at Eye Care and Vision Associates please call 716.631-EYES (3937) or visit www.ecvaeyecare.com .

How do Blood Sugar Levels Affect Eyesight?

High blood sugar levels have a significant effect on eyesight, causing various conditions like blurry vision, cataracts, glaucoma, and retinopathy. What are these conditions and how to they result from high blood sugar levels? We’re going to talk about each one, their cause, and any treatment methods available.

Blurred Vision

When someone experiences blurred vision, it doesn’t necessarily warrant an eye exam, or a new lens prescription. High blood sugar levels cause swelling in the lens of the eye, temporarily causing changes in vision. The common remedy to this condition is simply getting blood sugar levels back into a target range. Before meals, this range is between 70-130 mg/dL. After meals, the target range is 180 mg/dL. Eyesight should return to normal within three months of regulated blood sugar levels.

Cataracts

Normally associated with aging, cataracts are a common condition among all populations. They are a result of proteins in the lens of the eye becoming clumped together, forming a cloudy area of the lens. Cataracts may present as blurred vision or even vision that takes on a brownish tint. People who live with diabetes are more likely to get cataracts earlier in life, and the progression of the condition is much faster. The only treatment of cataracts involves surgery to remove the cloudy lens and replace it with a clear, artificial one.

Glaucoma

When fluid cannot properly drain from the eye, pressure increases. That pressure has the ability to damage nerves and blood vessels, which ultimately changes a person’s vision. The most common type of glaucoma is open-angle glaucoma, which can be treated with medicines that specifically target the drainage of the eye. They speed up the drainage, lower the pressure within the eye, and reduce the liquid that the eye makes. Routine eye exams will allow your doctor to identify glaucoma, likely before a person feels the first symptoms or has major vision loss.

Other forms of glaucoma present with symptoms like headaches, eye pain, blurry vision, watery eyes, and vision loss. Treatments for these forms of glaucoma are medicine, eye drops, surgery, and laser treatments.

With regard to diabetes, those who have issues with high blood sugar levels are also at an increased risk of getting a condition called neovascular glaucoma. This condition causes new blood vessels to grow on the iris of the eye, blocking the natural flow of fluid and increasing eye pressure. It may require laser surgery or implants that aid in fluid drainage.

Diabetic Retinopathy

The back of the eye contains a group of cells that process light, called the retina. The retina turns that light into images that the optic nerve can send to the brain. When small blood vessels in the retina become damaged from high blood sugar levels, a condition called diabetic retinopathy occurs. Without early treatment, a patient risks blindness. As long as the patient effectively manages thier diabetes, the chances of experiencing diabetic retinopathy remain low.

If someone has a diagnosis of eye issues that are related to diabetes, the best thing they can do is take preventative measures to ensure their vision doesn’t worsen. Focusing on regulating blood sugar levels aids in preventing new problems while also slowing the progression of issues they currently experience. People with diabetes should also consider keeping a regular schedule for eye exams to monitor any vision complications.

Book an Appointment Today!

If you have further questions or would like to schedule an appointment with one of the Ophthalmologists at Eye Care and Vision Associates please call 716.631-EYES (3937) or visit www.ecvaeyecare.com .